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Wednesday, May 13, 2020 | History

3 edition of Range cattle impacts on stream water quality in the Colorado Front Range found in the catalog.

Range cattle impacts on stream water quality in the Colorado Front Range

Steven R. Johnson

Range cattle impacts on stream water quality in the Colorado Front Range

by Steven R. Johnson

  • 55 Want to read
  • 34 Currently reading

Published by Forest Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station in [Fort Collins, Colo.] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Water quality management -- Front Range (Colo. and Wyo.),
  • Cattle -- Front Range (Colo. and Wyo.)

  • Edition Notes

    StatementSteven R. Johnson, Howard L. Gary and Stanley L. Ponce.
    SeriesResearch note RM -- 359.
    ContributionsGary, Howard L., Ponce, Stanley L., Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station (Fort Collins, Colo.)
    The Physical Object
    Pagination9 p. :
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17828478M
    OCLC/WorldCa9367804

    Agouridis CT, Edwards DR, Workman SR, Bicudo JR, Taraba JL, Vanzant ES et al. Effects of cattle grazing and BMPs on stream water quality. In ASAE Annual International Meeting In ASAE Annual International Meeting Cited by: 2. Today's Agricultural Weather Highlights. Updated daily around AM CT. Loading Widget Weather Links U.S. Drought Outlook. North American Drought Monitor. Palmer Drought Severity Index. Weekly Agricultural Drought Report. Weekly Weather & Crop Bulletin. U.S. Standardized Precipitation Index. NOAA Monthly National Overview.

    n adequate drinking water supply is an essential component of cattle production. Producers need to be con-cerned with the amount of water sup-plied and the quality of that water. This publication provides information related to drinking water quality requirements for cattle as well as water sampling and testing guidelines. Why Test WaterFile Size: KB. ground water hydrology in Loch Vale, an alpine catchment in the Front Range of the Colorado Rocky Mountains. The objective is to quantify the occurrence and movement of ground water and its contribution to the hydrology of an alpine stream. The distribution and physical characteristics of major hydrogeomorphologic units are described based.

    Timing of Cattle Grazing Alters Impacts on Stream Banks in an Oregon Mountain Watershed Article in Journal of Soil and Water Conservation 64(6) December with 22 Reads.   A new report on Colorado’s water usage concludes that the Front Range uses about 19 percent of the state’s water, yet generates between 80 and 86 percent of its economic activity and tax revenue.


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Range cattle impacts on stream water quality in the Colorado Front Range by Steven R. Johnson Download PDF EPUB FB2

Quantify the impacts of seasonal cattle grazing on the chemical and bacteriologi- cal characteristics of surface water- in a typical stream in the Colorado Front Range. A secondary objective was to deter- mine whether local grazing management practices should be changed to maintain or enhance existing stream water quality.

Study area. Range cattle impacts on stream water quality in the Colorado Front Range. [Fort Collins, Colo.]: Forest Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, [] (OCoLC) Range Cattle Impacts on Stream Water Quality in the Colorado Front Range Paperback – January 1, by Steven R.

Et Al Johnson (Author) See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions. Price New from Used from Author: Steven R. Et Al Johnson. Watershed erosion can dramatically increase after wildfire, but limited research has evaluated the corresponding influence on source-water quality.

This study evaluated the effects of the Fourmile Canyon wildfire (Colorado Front Range, USA) on source-water quality and aquatic ecosystems using high- frequency sampling.

Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nutrient loads in stream. Water quality effect of rangeland beef cattle excrement impact on surface water quality in a Colorado front range.

a better understanding of the impacts of cattle grazing on stream bank. vegetation destruction, and water quality impair-ments. Although many studies reported grazing impacts, others found minimal changes. Gary et al. () noted that even when cattle spent more than 65 percent of the day within m of a Colorado stream and 5 percent of the day in or adjacent to the stream, only small changes to water quality.

As the dominant Front Range city, Denver began fil-ing for municipal water rights in the Colorado River Basin (west of the Continental Divide) in the s, and completed the Moffat Tunnel in to transfer more t acre-feet of water per year through the Front Range mountains.

Denver’s Dillon Reservoir was com-Cited by: 9. In the Western United States and Canada, open range is rangeland where cattle roam freely regardless of land ownership.

Where there are "open range" laws, those wanting to keep animals off their property must erect a fence to keep animals out; this applies to public roads as well.

Land in open range that is designated as part of a "herd district" reverses liabilities, requiring an. Therefore, stream biofilms complement water quality sampling and capture ecological impacts that traditional sampling may miss. Preliminary Findings and Ongoing Work.

The Fourmile Canyon fire occurred at the end of the summer during a very dry period, and rainfall in the fall after the wildfire was by: 2. National Water-Quality Assessment Program Effects of Urban Development on Stream Ecosystems along the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains, Colorado and Wyoming Printed on recycled paper By Lori A.

Sprague, Robert E. Zuellig, and Jean A. Dupree T he U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a study from Author: Lori A. Sprague, Robert E. Zuellig, Jean A. Dupree. The data sets contain the project's forty-five ,scale, minute quadrangles included in the demonstration area that covers the Front Range of Colorado, south from Ft.

Collins to the southern portion of the Denver metropolitan area (not including Highlands Ranch in Douglas County), and west from Denver International Airport to the.

This work examined the plot-scale differences in soil-water retention caused by wildfire in the area of the Fourmile Canyon Fire in the Colorado Front Range, United States.

We measured soil-water retention curves on intact cores and repacked samples, soil particle-size distributions, and organic matter content. Estimates were also made of plant-available water based on the soil Cited by: Water quality implications of cattle grazing on a semiarid watershed in southeastern Utah.

Range Manage. 29 (2). Byers, F.M. Fossil energy use in beef production. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a study from through through its National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program to determine the effects of urbanization on the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of stream ecosystems along the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains.

Rauzi, F. Water-intake studies on range soils at three locations in the Northern Plains (U.S.A.) (J. Range Manage, 13 (4)). Skinner, Q.

et al. Effect of summer use of a mountain watershed on bacterial water quality. Environ. Quality 3 (4). Smeins, F. Effects of livestock grazing on runoff and erosión.

In Colorado, landowners have the inherent right to fence their land or leave it unfenced. In the early 's the Colorado legislature passed a "fencing" statute. This statute is commonly referred to as the "open range" or "fence out" statute.

"Open range" is a definition of land, not a law. This work examined the plot-scale differences in soil-water retention caused by wildfire in the area of the Fourmile Canyon Fire in the Colorado Front Range, United States. We measured soil-water retention curves on intact cores and repacked samples, soil particle-size distributions, and organic matter content.

Estimates were also made of plant-available water based on. The Colorado Range Cattle Industry Hardcover – January 1, by Ora Brooks Peake (Author)Author: Ora Brooks Peake. [1] This work examined the plot‐scale differences in soil‐water retention caused by wildfire in the area of the Fourmile Canyon Fire in the Colorado Front Range, United States.

We measured soil‐water retention curves on intact cores and repacked samples, soil particle‐size distributions, and organic matter by: water quality specialists and other professionals on a wide range of water quality parameters and related physiological and/or toxicological effects.

Many producers may also find the information useful in identifying problems and symptoms relating to water quality. While preparing this document, a deliberate attempt was made to minimize theFile Size: 1MB. Livestock production may account for over 50% of the nation's NH3 inventory and is thus often at the center of NH3 air quality issues.

Nowhere is this issue more evident or pressing than along the Front Range of Colorado where the pristine alpine systems in the Rocky Mountains are bordered to the east by historically intensive cattle feeding areas.Knowledge of runoff quality from beef cattle feedlot pens would be useful to design effective management practices to protect water quality.

This publication is intended to share runoff quality measurements from three beef cattle feedlot pen surfaces under North Dakota management and climatic conditions.Here are the basics on ozone, which has long been an issue for Colorado air quality.

In this Jan. 24,file photo, the Rocky Mountains rise beyond the Denver skyline. (Photo: Charlie Riedel, AP)Author: Cory Reppenhagen.